Conservative Index Add
pagetitle

Tuesday, August 21st, 2018Last Update: Tuesday, July 31st, 2018 11:05:57 AM

Why are Supreme Court Vacancies a Big Deal?

By: Congressman Markwayne Mullin

President Trump has made again what is arguably the most important decision a president could make during his time in the White House: he nominated another judge to the Supreme Court of the United States. Keeping the promises he made to the American people, President Trump nominated Judge Brett Kavanaugh, a highly-qualified judge with a track record of upholding the Constitution, to the Supreme Court.

Unlike elected officials, Supreme Court Justices serve for a lifetime. Presidents can only serve for a total of eight years. On average, a member of the House of Representatives in the 115th Congress has served about nine years. Senators in the 115th Congress have served on average for just over 10 years. The length of these elected positions pale in comparison to the lifelong tenure of a Supreme Court Justice, and rightfully so.

Supreme Court Justices serve on the bench for life so they are protected from political backlash. Their appointment allows them to serve impartially, without fear of retribution for a ruling on a case. The average length of a Justice’s tenure is 16 years. At age 53, Judge Kavanaugh may very well meet or exceed the average length of service.

Any president given an opportunity to fill a Supreme Court vacancy holds the power to shape the future of the Court. These Justices play an important role in ruling on major issues that impact the American people, including immigration and pro-life policies. In a day and age when our Constitution is consistently under attack, it is vital that our Supreme Court uphold the Constitution as it was written. I am confident that Judge Kavanaugh will do just that.

Judge Kavanaugh has dedicated his life to public service, with 25 years serving as a judge in the court system and in the White House under President George W. Bush. He has served on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit for more than 10 years and authored more than 300 opinions on cases. He has been married to his wife, Ashley, for 14 years and they have two daughters. He coaches both of his daughter’s school basketball teams. He serves at a reader at his church and volunteers his time to serve meals to needy families. A dedicated family man and active community service member, Judge Kavanaugh is the principled conservative our Supreme Court needs.

Judge Kavanaugh wrote that “the judge’s job is to interpret the law, not to make the law or make policy. So read the words of the statute as written. Read the text of the Constitution as written, mindful of history and tradition. Don’t make up new constitutional rights that are not in the text of the Constitution.” Judge Kavanaugh is an excellent choice to serve the American people on the Supreme Court and I look forward to following the Senate as they move forward with his confirmation process.

In The News

Constitution Staff

Races for Congress
The U.S. Congress is composed of two chambers. Senators serve six-year terms with only a third of...

Constitution Staff

Statewide Secondary Offices
In addition to the governors office, a host of secondary statewide offices, and one seat for the...

Constitution Staff

Race for Governor Continues
Mary Fallin was prohibited by term-limits from seeking a third four-year term in 2018. With the seat...

Constitution Staff

Medical Marijuana Approved by Voters
There was only one state question on the June 26 primary election ballot, and it was approved by...

Constitution Staff

Oklahoma State Legislators Rated
The Oklahoma Constitution presents the 40th annual Oklahoma Conservative Index, rating our state...

Constitution Columnists

Brandon Dutcher

What Type of School Would Oklahomans Select?
Leaders in the public-education community often point out (correctly) that the vast majority of...

Richard Engle

A Few Modest Proposals
As candidates for office, from statewide to state house, search for votes, they might want an idea...

Andrew K. Boyle

Oklahoma Pot in a Nation of Nazis
Polemic prose concerning political discourse abounds at present, in the most bizarre terms. It plays...

© 2001 - 2009 The Oklahoma Constitution, all rights reserved.
Contact the Oklahoma Constitution by calling 405-366-1125 or emailing okconsti@aol.com
Content Management System (CMS) provided by WebTeks CMS.